Pick of the Week – WINTER’S BONE

Remember last year when THE HURT LOCKER won Best Picture and you felt all cool because you saw it in theaters before anyone else way back in July?  Here’s your chance to feel that cool all over again.

2010 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner WINTER’S BONE played a few weeks at the AMC at Quail Springs, but now gets the posh treatment of a weekend at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art.  Click here for times and ticket info.

CALL FOR ENTRIES…Now Open For Your Submitting Pleasure


deadCENTER Film Festival is now accepting entries for the 2011 festival, which will be held June 8-12, 2011. Submitting your film or short screenplay is easy and free. Clicky on the link above to check out categories, deadlines, and entry rules.

Happy submitting! Read more…

deadCENTER kicks off Fall Education Program

deadCENTER Film kicked off our 2010 Fall Education program at Jenks High School. Under the leadership of film teacher Clifton Raphael, Jenks High School has become one of the preeminent programs in Oklahoma, creating the first and only entirely high-school-produced program to air on Oklahoma statewide TV: Behind the Lens with Oklahoma’s Future Filmmakers on OETA. Mr. Raphael started each class with a class critique of a short doc, followed by a presentation from the deadCENTER Film staff about the process of entering a film into festivals, how the film festival circuit works, the advantages to filmmakers of screening in the festival atmosphere and examples of great student films that have done well on the festival circuit. The session then focused on the education and feature film experience of Executive Director Lance McDaniel and COO Kim Haywood, providing an overview of the various Oklahoma collegiate programs and an outline of career paths within professional filmmaking. The classes ended with a look the film Rainbow Around the Sun, produced by Kim Haywood and co-directed by deadCENTER Film Program Director Kevin Ely. For info on how to get deadCENTER Film to present at your school, please email lance@deadcenterfilm.org.

Pick of the Week: OFFICIAL REJECTION

Beginning this week, every Tuesday we’ll be pointing out a new film in theaters, on demand, or on DVD that we think you should know about. This week Program Director Kevin Ely looks at 2009 Best Documentary Award Winner OFFICIAL REJECTION. Got a pick of the week? Post your picks in the comments below.

In 2006, writer Paul Osborne and director Scott Smith brought their indie thriller TEN TILL NOON to deadCENTER, walked away with the Jury Prize for Documentary Feature, and hit the festival trail in search of fame and glory. In 2009, Paul and Scott returned to deadCENTER with a new film and a huge chip on their shoulder.

OFFICIAL REJECTION tells the sordid tale of Scott and Paul’s death march through the highs and lows of the independent film festival circuit, debunking the rags-to-riches myths perpetuated by festival behemoths like Sundance, and providing a firm-but-loving slap in the face to delusional filmmakers around the world. Did I mention that it’s hilarious?

Somehow director Osborne manages to create an unflinching, (semi) sober and jaded look at the politics of the festival process without losing the enthusiasm and love for movies that brought him there in the first place. Maybe it’s the genuine camaraderie between him and TTN director Scott Storm that comes through in every scene. Maybe it’s the good experiences they have along the way in places like Phoenix (and Oklahoma City, sadly relegated to the end credits). Maybe it’s the drinks. Whatever. Paul Osborne made a great doc that should be seen by indie-film lovers everywhere, and should be required viewing in every film program in the country.

Get OFFICIAL REJECTION on Netflix starting today, or purchase your own copy here.

Let’s do this Norman!

Join the always amazing Fred Jones Museum of Art in Norman and deadCENTER Film Festival as we preview some of our best festival short films this Friday at Art a la CART. All films and art activities that evening are free. Say what?! Yep, it’s free. Stop by and say hello from 6-9pm.

Head over to the Fred Jones Museum of Art website for more info, http://www.ou.edu/fjjma/home.html.

And, as always, stay awesome.

Google Wave is Dead. Long Live Google Wave.

Over at The Candler Blog, friend of the festival Jonathan Poritsky is lamenting the recent demise of Google Wave, which is something a lot of people have been doing. What he’s thinking about, though, is the impact on filmmakers – what does this mean for the future of filmmaker collaboration on the web? Why did no one use Google Wave to actually make a movie?

The whole article is worth your time, but the way he ends it is especially poignant:

“For now, creators will keep on creating. Like anything else, these are just tools. Google Wave was a bold move in the right direction towards central collaboration. There is no way to look at this as a failure for Google, or for any of us. The conversation has shifted. Now we need to take the momentum that Google Wave kicked off and the tools it will leave behind to keep the conversation up so that when the technology falls in line, we will be there to adopt filmmaking methodologies that move us forward.”

The future of filmmaking on the web is definitely an exciting one, and I hope Jonathan is correct in thinking we’re closer than anyone thinks to being able to create films solely online.

For now, though, hop over to his post and join the discussion.

The Referral: The Filmcake finishes a film, has regrets, starts a discussion

Our good friend Dwight over at The Filmcake published a really interesting blog post we think deserves your attention. Having just finished his first short film, he has begun to reflect on the reviews he’s written from the perspective of a new filmmaker.

Along the way, he touches on several things many of us involved with independent film at any level struggle with – how important are access and funding? To what extent, if any, should those circumstances affect or make themselves known to the viewer? And finally, how should critics approach low or no-budget films?

Read the whole thing here. And when you’re done, we’d love to hear what you think about the subject in our comments section below.

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