The Referral: The Filmcake finishes a film, has regrets, starts a discussion

Our good friend Dwight over at The Filmcake published a really interesting blog post we think deserves your attention. Having just finished his first short film, he has begun to reflect on the reviews he’s written from the perspective of a new filmmaker.

Along the way, he touches on several things many of us involved with independent film at any level struggle with – how important are access and funding? To what extent, if any, should those circumstances affect or make themselves known to the viewer? And finally, how should critics approach low or no-budget films?

Read the whole thing here. And when you’re done, we’d love to hear what you think about the subject in our comments section below.

4 Questions: THE ROUNDER COMES TO TOWN

We thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers. So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.

One of our up-and-coming Oklahoma filmmakers this year is Adam Beatty, whose debut short The Rounder Comes to Town screens in the Okie Shorts 2 program Saturday, June 12th at 5:30pm.

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

It’s like Django meets The Hustler.  I don’t feel like that’s accurate, but it’s all I can think of.
The Rounder Comes to Town is an Okie Gothic film based on a traditional song dating back to 1720. Read more…

4 Questions: EN TUS MANOS

We thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers. So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.

En Tus Manos is a unique hybrid of indie film: Produced by Oklahomans, filmed in Bogota, Columbia, featuring Actors from Columbia and Mexico, and exploring themes that are universal. It screens as part of the Worldview Shorts Program Thursday, June 10th at 7:30pm.

Here’s Producer Brent Green and Director Ron Jacobs:

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

En Tus Manos is a short narrative film that depicts a Latin American young man who wants to escape his bad home life. In order to do so, he joins a gang. However, what he finds is that it takes courage to do what’s right regardless of the consequences when you are choosing between life or death and love or hatred. Read more…

4 Questions: DOWN IN NUMBER 5

We thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers. So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.

Meet Kim Spurlock, director of Down in Number 5, a haunting short film (based on a true story) about a retired coal miner struggling to care for his 40-year old developmentally disabled son.  Down in Number 5 screens with the documentary feature Rachel Is on Thursday, June 10th at 5:30pm.

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

“Down in Number 5″ is a Southern Gothic fact-based fiction.  I can’t think of a pop culture reference for it!  I don’t feel entirely comfortable comparing myself to authors of such stature, but if I had to pick, I would say it is like Harper Lee meets Flannery O’Connor? Read more…

4 Questions: IN THIS PLACE

We thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers.  So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.  We’ll be randomly posting as many responses as we can fit in between now and the kick-off.

Today’s filmmaker is Amy Bench, who wrote and directed In This Place, featured in our free-to-the-public Kids Fest program of family-friendly films.

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

It’s like Wes Anderson meets Michel Gondry meets Miranda July. Read more…

4 Questions: THE GOOD SOLDIER

We thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers.  So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.  We’ll be randomly posting as many responses as we can fit in between now and the kick-off.

Let’s hear from Aaron Gibson, whose film The Good Soldier will premiere in the X-Files shorts program, Friday, June 11th at 10:00pm.


1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

The Good Soldier is a WWII era nostalgia film with a Hitchcockian slant. Read more…

4 Questions: THE VAN

With just under two weeks left until the 10th deadCENTER extravaganza, we thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers.  So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.  We’ll be randomly posting as many responses as we can fit in between now and the kick-off.

Next up is Jeremy Berger, writer/director of The Van, which screens in our Comedy Shorts program Thursday, June 10th at 6:00pm and Saturday, June 12th at 3:00pm.

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

Moby Dick. With Bike Messengers. Read more…

4 Questions: LANDLOCKED

With just under two weeks left until the 10th deadCENTER extravaganza, we thought it would be a good idea to help you get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers.  So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.  We’ll be posting as many responses in random order as we can fit in between now and the kick-off.

Let’s hear from Jerry Melichar, director of Landlocked, which screens in our Okie Shorts 1 program Friday, June 11th at 6:00pm at the Kerr Auditorium:

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

LANDLOCKED is Hitchcock meets ELECTION. Read more…

4 Questions: THE ROBBERY

With just over two weeks left until the 10th deadCENTER extravaganza, we thought it would be a good idea to give you the opportunity to get to know some of our fantastic filmmakers.  So, borrowing an idea from LA Weekly’s Karina Longworth (the Bernard Pivot to our James Lipton), we submitted four questions to each filmmaker about and themselves and their films.  We’ll be posting as many responses in random order as we can fit in between now and the kick-off.

First up is Terry Holloway, director of the short film The Robbery, which screens Thursday, June 10th at 6:00pm and Saturday, June 12th at 3pm as part of the Comedy Shorts program.

1. Tell us about your movie. Give us the reductive, 25-word or less, “It’s like [pop culture reference a] meets [pop culture reference b]!” pitch, then explain what the quick and dirty sell leaves out.

My film The Robbery is a short punch to the gut from Oregon. We like bikes and we like beer… so I made a film about it. Read more…

A Look Back With Dwight Edwards of The Filmcake: The 2007 Festival

In the Guest Spot today, we have Dwight Edwards, the man behind the very cool Okie-film website The Filmcake. Dwight has attended deadCENTER every year since 2002 (we’re willing to forget the two years he was absent, as he was there in spirit), and even contributed to our live blog of the festival in 2009. Every Wednesday until the festival, we’ll feature his look back at the deadCENTER film festivals of old, starting with 2002. This week: 2007

I think the defining moment of the 2007 deadCENTER Film Festival was the WORLD PREMIERE of famed international auteur Esteban Don Von McDonaldson’s brilliant film, L’Hell. Truly, deadCENTER had come into its own with this spectacular get. First, it’s in French. So you know it’s really good. Second, it’s in black and white. So you know it’s REALLY good. Despite the infamy surrounding that film’s premier, it turns out there were some other films that screened at the festival as well. For this week’s look back, I re-watched UFO’s At The Zoo, Shwarma: Spawn From Hell, BITCH, and Man With a Moustache.

UFO’s At The Zoo — The Flaming Lips have become a deadCENTER staple. Wayne Coyne, Bradley Beesley, and George Salisbury brought their footage of the 9/15/06 Zoo Amphitheater concert to the Saturday night outdoor screening. They returned in 2008 with the long-awaited Christmas on Mars and this year’s they’ll bring their documentary short Blastula: The Making of Embryonic to the festival.

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